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Eye-tracking studyWhat is the distribution of clicks on a search engine results page? What percentage of clicks gets each search result according to its rank? How much more users’ attention gets the first listing compared to the second? Or how often do users click the listing below the page fold? The way users interact with SERPs is one of the most frequently discussed topics in the SEO community and is also a very important field of study for the search engine specialists. To answer the above questions researchers employ the so-called eye tracking experiments.

Eye-Tracking Studies

The objective of eye tracking studies is gaining insight into how users browse the presented abstracts and select links to click. The results of eye tracking research provide Internet marketers with information on clickthrough rates, thus allowing them to make correct predictions on traffic changes as their rankings are gained or lost. For SE engineers the results provide a basis for improving the interfaces of search engines and metrics to evaluate the relevancy of the presented search results.

To detect users’ interaction patterns the eye tracking experiment observes a number of indicators of ocular behavior using a CCD (charged couple device) camera similar to the appliance used to read bar codes. The indices of ocular behavior include eye fixations, saccades, scan paths and pupil dilation. Eye fixations are defined as a stable gaze lasting for 200-300 milliseconds representing visual attention to a specific area of a SERP. Pupil dilations or pupil diameter changes represent a measurement of interest in a particular listing. This variable is especially important as it helps interpreting an implicit user feedback to the relevancy of the presented search results.

Cornell University Eye-Tracking Analysis of SE Users’ Behavior

One of the most recent eye tracking studies was performed at Cornell University by Laura A. Granka, Thorsten Joachims and Geri Cay ([1]). They used a sample of undergraduate students instructed to perform search in Google for 397 queries o topics covering movies, travel, music, politics, local and trivia. This study has produced the following results.

Google Click Distribution map

Fig 1. Google SEPR Click and Attention distribution ‘heat-map’

Study Results: Clicks and Attention Distribution

As you can see from the graph below and a SERP ‘heat-map’ based on it, the first two listings capture over a half of the user’s attention in terms of time of the eye fixation. Whereas the attention is shared almost equally, the difference in number of click between the first two listings is much more surprising: over four times! After the second listing the eye fixation drops sharply. Search results number 6 to 10 receive roughly equal attention. Here an interesting thing is that the 7th listing gets less attention than the succeeding 8th – apparently here we can observe the effect of the page fold. The 7th listing is just below the screen edge and is often skipped as users scroll the page down to the bottom (during the study the 7th listing was clicked only once). On the graph you can also see the 11th listing from the second page of the search results. It gets only about 1 percent of clicks and user attention – 2.5 times less than the lowest ranked result on the page one.

Click and attention distribution

Fig 2. Time spent on viewing each results compared to the number of clicks. Source [1]

Often people consider getting to the ‘top-ten’ of Google as a measurement of the SEO success. Evidently this is a rather rough approximation. The ‘top-ten’ itself is a very diverse group with the number of clicks increasing almost logarithmically as your rank grows. For instance, the first five positions get over 88% of the traffic, and the first three – 79%.

SERP Browsing Patterns

Another important result of this study is the discovery of the browsing pattern: the way people read a SEPR. To assess the performance of the search algorithm it is vital to know how users evaluate the presented abstracts before clicking one of them. For example, if a user clicks the third listing, did he look the abstracts above and below it? The following figure shows how many results above and below of the selected listing are scanned on average.

Browsing pattern

Fig.3 Number of results scanned above and below the selected abstract. Source [1]

The effect of the page fold is clearly demonstrated here as well. While the first 5 listings are clicked after browsing through 1 to 2.68 listings above and below, the 7th listing is clicked after the entire page is examined! The listings below the page fold (8-10) are clicked after the first five or four listings are scanned. You can also see that the number of listings scanned above the clicked result is much bigger than the number of listings below. This indicates that users browse the list from top to bottom.

To Sum Up

While the study deals only with the first page of the organic search results, it can be assumed that similar results can be produced for other pages and perhaps even for the list of the paid ads in the right sidebar.

In addition to the academic researches there is a number of companies producing eye-tracking studies for the commercial use. The most notable of them are Eyetools.com and Poynterextra (http://www.poynterextra.org/EYETRACK2004/index.htm)

References:

1. Laura A. Granka, Thorsten Joachims, Geri Gay. ‘Eye-tracking analysis of user behavior in WWW search’, SIGIR, 2004. Available at http://www.cs.cornell.edu/People/tj/publications/granka_etal_04a.pdf Retrieved on 26.10.06

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265 Responses to “Distribution of Clicks on Google’s SERPs”

  1. fauigerzigerk Says:

    Interesting. I have some doubts about the validity of the study though. The testers were apparently provided with predetermined search terms. They had no intention of their own to find anything in particular. So they basically skimmed the results top to bottom with less interest the further down they went. That’s not searching!

    When I search, my eyes rest on those entries that might match my intentions because I read not just the title but also some of the digest to see whether the link is worth following. These people had no intentions so all links were equally irrelevant for them.

  2. oleg.ishenko Says:

    The validity of the research suffers because of the relatively small sample – only 26 participants. The patterns of search were quite natural. All the participants claimed they regularly use Google, and it was their primary search engine. Probably the search terms were predefined, but I don’t see how this could damage the validity of the study. When I am looking for a subject I usually use no more than 3 keyphrases myself, as I am (as any average web user) able to come up with a keyword/phrase relevant to my search subject in the early stages of the search.

  3. fauigerzigerk Says:

    The point is that in a real life situation, you have something in mind that you’re looking for. Then you translate that into keywords but the keywords do not express the whole context of what you want to find. So when the result page comes up, what you do is to match the entries to your original intent in its entire context. When someone else tells you to enter particular keywords, you don’t have the same situation. You don’t have the keywords on the one hand and your desire to find something that belongs to a context on the other. You have just the keywords. And that, I suspect, leads to a very different way of reading the result page.

    What they should have done is ask the testers to use google to answer questions like “Which world power occupied the land that is today called Iraq during World War I?”. The testers would surely have received results about Iraq during WWI mixed with entries about the current Iraq war. But they would’ve filtered out the ones that were clearly not about historical matters. They would’ve preferred the ones from sources like Wikipedia to news items from TV stations because they knew that Wikipedia entries are more systematic and might mention occupying forces. They would’ve focused on entries that mentioned other powers like the British, the Turkish, etc.

    What they would certainly not have done is to scan the page indiscriminately from top to bottom with decreasing attention.

  4. Eye-Tracking: Analysis of User Behavior in Websites and Search Engines - Cristian Mezei Says:

    [...] Here is the original Cornell paper via SeoResearcher. [...]

  5. Website and Search Engine User Behavior Analysis Says:

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  8. Blokken.dk » Google: Eyetracking viser hvor der klikkes Says:

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  9. Should You Put Your Company Name in Title tags? Says:

    [...] However, since I’m pretty sure that you’re not trying to rank for “yellow puma shoes” and your goals might be a little different than mine, the best advice I can give is: run a search for what you want to rank for, compare what you see, and think about what you would most likely click on as a human being if you had the attention span of 200-300 milliseconds. [...]

  10. ittechnology.us » Blog Archive » Badanie klikalnoÅ›ci wyników wyszukiwania Google Says:

    [...] Wiadomość o badaniu i rysunki zostały wzięte ze strony : Distribution of Clicks on Google’s SERPs. Całość badania można przestudiować w materiale: http://www.cs.cornell.edu/People/tj/publications/granka_etal_04a.pdf. [...]

  11. Search Marketing Facts » Distribution of Clicks on Google?s SERPs Says:

    [...] What is the distribution of clicks on a search engine results page? What percentage of clicks gets each search result according to its rank? How much more users? attention gets the first listing compared to the second? Or how often do users click the listing below […]Read full entry [...]

  12. What is Organic Search? » vitaminSEO.com.au Says:

    [...] To put it bluntly, if you are not on the first page then you are nowhere. To make matters worse, the difference between being in the first position of a search engine results page (SERP) and last place is huge. A recent eye-tracking study by the Cornell University showed that the first result on a google results page recieves 56.36% of clicks compared to last result which only recieves only 2.55% of clicks. [...]

  13. James Grove Says:

    How did you come up with the percentage of clicks you used in Fig 1? When I reviewed the PDF in footnote 1, I did not see any specific data about how many people clicked each link.

    Did you just estimate the actual number of clicks based on the gray bars in figure 2? If so, I think I have reverse-engineered the numbers you used:

    Rank Clicks % of Clicks
    1 155 56.36%
    2 37 13.45%
    3 27 9.82%
    4 11 4.00%
    5 13 4.73%
    6 9 3.27%
    7 1 0.36%
    8 8 2.91%
    9 4 1.45%
    10 7 2.55%
    11 3 1.09%
    Total 275 100.00%

    Interestingly, these numbers indicate that there are only 275 clicks in these results, although the study says there were 397 queries. Does that mean the other 122 queries did not result in any clicks? Or were they clicks on results 12 or higher, so they didn’t show up in the chart?

    I’m curious to know more about what happens on the 2nd and 3rd pages of search results. This data implies (by the inclusion of result 11 in fig. 2) that many fewer people saw or clicked on that second page of results. Does that mean that results 12 and up had even fewer clicks than 11? Does the distribution of clicks on page 2 mirror that of page 1, or is it a flatter curve?

    I’d love to hear about any follow-up research.

    -James Grove

  14. oleg.ishenko Says:

    Dear James,

    yes you’re right, I estimated the percentages from fig. 2 exactly like you did. I was myself surprised with the missing clicks and it was possible that some of those clicks were made on the 2nd and 3rd pages but were not reported in the research results. Also some of the clicks probably were just not counted.

    Obviously the authors of the research could not calculate a valid distribution of clicks for the 2nd and 3rd pages because of the low number of clicks done in those areas during the experiment. A much bigger number of participants would be required for that.

    I believe there are more eye-tracking studies including those ones covering more than the 1st page of search results. I used this one because it was ‘approved’ by Google – I found it among the ‘Papers by Googlers’ at Google Labs: labs.google.com/papers.html

  15. viz.loc8ed :: Eye tracking studies Says:

    [...] The blog Online Marketing Research posted an article called “Distribution of Clicks on Google’s SERPs,” which discusses eye tracking behavior on Google’s search engine results pages.  There is an interesting visualization of a “heat map” that shows how users view these search results relative to their position on the page.  This is a convincing argument to sell a company search engine optimization services in order to get them up into the “red zone.”  There are also some other great visualizations of user behaviors, as well. [...]

  16. search engine optimization » Eye tracking studies Says:

    [...] The blog Online Marketing Research posted an article called “Distribution of Clicks on Google’s SERPs,” which discusses eye tracking behavior on Google’s search engine results pages.  There is an interesting visualization of a “heat map” that shows how users view these search results relative to their position on the page.  This is a convincing argument to sell a company search engine optimization services in order to get them up into the “red zone.”  There are also some other great visualizations of user behaviors, as well. [...]

  17. Fördelning av klick i Google SERP:s Says:

    [...] Hela studien (en av många) av detta fenomen kan du läsa här: Distribution of Clicks on Google’s SERPs [...]

  18. Perry Says:

    I\’m not impressed.

    Sorry.

    You all need to think about this….

    You aren\’t keeping in mind that the students knew they were on some sort of research study. I don\’t know about you, but I would probably click on the first link also.

    When looking for stuff, I myself have clicked on the first link many times. So what? I have also clicked on the second, third, fourth…. We all have. And we have because we are looking for better and more selections. That business that is ranked at the top or near the top may have a lousy site. They may cost too much. On and on….

    Of all those test subjects who clicked on the first link, well, they aren\’t go any further because they aren\’t looking for anything. They are just on a test research.

    Women, especially like to shop around. Not all, of course.

    I have also read this \”research\”:

    Ranking Number 1 receives 42.1 percent of click throughs.
    Ranking Number 2 receives 11.9 percent of click throughs.
    Ranking Number 3 receives 8.5 percent of click throughs.
    Ranking Number 4 receives 6.1 percent of click throughs.
    Ranking Number 5 receives 4.9 percent of click throughs.
    Ranking Number 6 receives 4.1 percent of click throughs.
    Ranking Number 7 receives 3.4 percent of click throughs.
    Ranking Number 8 receives 3.0 percent of click throughs.
    Ranking Number 9 receives 2.8 percent of click throughs.
    Ranking Number 10 receives 3.0 percent of click throughs.

    I\’m sorry, but that isn\’t even close to being believable, and not all is being told.

    I have clicked on several links throughout page one. Sometimes on page two. And so have you! I have asked a lot of people if they stopped after clicking on the first one. The answer, every single time was \”no.\”

    Look at all the porn sites out there. You think all those guys are going to stop at the first link and not click on the others? Nope. How \’bout all those \”funny news\” and \”funny pcitures\” sites? Nope. What about singles looking for dating and sex advice? Not even close.

    And how \’bout during the holidays, and fathers and mothers day? You think many of those shoppers are going to click on JUST one link?

    Sorry, but those figures aren\’t right. Not even close.

    So there is much more to that \”research\” than meets the eye.

  19. SEO Copywriting - Jak pozyskać najbardziej wpływowych czytelników w Internecie | Copywriting w Internecie. Słowo daję, zyski rosną! Says:

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  20. SEOmoz | New Ways to Monetize the SERPs | SEO Manager’s Weekly Says:

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  21. Clickthrough Rates in the Age of Google Universal Search | Search Marketing Standard Blog Says:

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  23. Michael Duz Says:

    As others have suggested the original Cornell study is deeply flawed.

    A more insightful study analyzing the AOL research data accidentally released last year is based on 36,389,567 search queries http://www.seo-blog.com/serps-position-and-clickthroughs.php

    Of course clickthrough rates are search term dependent but this gives a very good indication of the ‘average’ clickthrough rates and I even constructed a tool based on this data http://www.seo-blog.com/position-and-clickthrough-tool.php

    - Michael

  24. Steven Says:

    I find the research results very interesting, althought there were apparent problems, such as the small participant group size.

  25. Daniel Moll Says:

    Są frazy gdzie pierwsze kilka pierwszych miejsc zajmuja portale i platformy, wynik zaraz po nich (czyli na dole 1 strony) jest niekorzystny, lepiej byc 11 niż przykładowo 8mym. (1 na drugiej stronie)

  26. Emc2 - Piotr J. Kober blog » Perfekcja kliknięć - czyli jak czytamy teksty i wyberamy reklamy Says:

    [...] Informacje o badaniach zostały zaczerpnięte ze strony Distribution of Clicks on Google’s SERPs. Polecam lekturę tego dokumentu, ponieważ można zapoznać się z komentarzami na temat wiarygodności przeprowadzonych testów. Dwa aspekty rzucają cień na wyniki: mała liczba zbadanych użytkowników (26 osób) oraz narzucenie testowych szukanych fraz. [...]

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    [...] Informacje o badaniach zostały zaczerpnąłem ze strony Distribution of Clicks on Google’s SERPs. Polecam lekturę tego dokumentu, ponieważ można zapoznać się z komentarzami na temat wiarygodności przeprowadzonych testów. Dwa aspekty rzucają cień na wyniki: mała liczba zbadanych użytkowników (26 osób) oraz narzucenie testowych szukanych fraz. [...]

  28. videomood Says:

    yes you’re right, I estimated the percentages from fig. 2 exactly like you did. I was myself surprised with the missing clicks and it was possible that some of those clicks were made on the 2nd and 3rd pages but were not reported in the research results. Also some of the clicks probably were just not counted.

  29. kompresory Says:

    It`s a great article ! I`m shocked about the 7th place thing ! It`s really useful. Can add a link to this article on my website? Greetings

  30. The SERPs Teeter Totter by Erik Karey: Internet Entrepreneur Says:

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  32. Ersen Says:

    This is great working. 7th more low than 8th. Interesting.

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  34. Blind spot on the first page : navigatron Says:

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  35. SEO Champion Says:

    This is interesting. Click throughs are not distributed hierarchically. If the above study is correct then I’d rather stay on 11th position than on 7th & 10th. But of course it would have been more accurate if done on large number of respondents.

  36. SEO Champion Says:

    I mean 7th position only.

  37. Wata Cukrowa Says:

    Very interesting points, I had a webpage on 5th place and I had 100 clicks per month, now I reached 1st and I have 300 clicks on average.

  38. Jaan Kanellis Says:

    I agree that this survey can be thrown out since the search keywords are predetermined. This creates a situation where the user is more apt to click the first listing since they are really not “trying” to find anything. I assume that if the users was told to research subjects and then answer questions on the subjects, this would change the order percentage clicked greatly.

  39. Ralph Says:

    Although, the article is not actual the topic will be actual always.

    Thank you for your great study with much new iadeas to improve the own online-strategy-concept.

    Ralph

  40. seo-know-how Says:

    Seo – Top Ten…

    In der gesamten Seo-Blog-Szene und darüber hinaus ist eine Differenzierung zu verzeichnen. Da fällt es auf, dass die Qualität manchmal den Bach hinunter geht. In manchem Blog findet man Beiträge, die eine Länge von einigen weni…

  41. UtahRusseo Says:

    This is an incredible study. More reason to go for no. 1.

  42. Winning on the Internet Says:

    Very interesting. Obviously results will vary between markets and search queries. They tested 397 different queries among an assortment of topics. People looking for information will likely focus on organic listings, where a higher percentage will look at paid search if looking for a product. The graph does not account for paid search nor does it mention how it affected results. Nonetheless, I think we can all agree, the higher, the better.

  43. SEO Come Says:

    Hello, do you have any such research on Yahoo and MSN? I think they as important as Google. Thanks.

  44. webpixelkonsum Says:

    @SEO Come: Yes, Yahoo is interesting for me, too. The actual problem is the bad image of Yahoo and the extremly position of Goolge for SEO.

    Ralph

  45. seminyak Says:

    Intersting. I never imagine if the last position (10) in google SERP page better than position number 7-9.

    Thanks for the info

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  47. Frezowanie CNC Says:

    I disagree, Ive made my own research and the results are in favor of the first results on the second page.

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  55. vacation Says:

    It`s a great article ! I`m shocked about the 7th place thing ! It`s really useful. Can add a link to this article on my website? Greetings

  56. How To Increase Local Search Engine Ranking | Says:

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  60. Online Marketing Pune Says:

    Interesting analysis. Search engine users know the fact that the first result in the SERP is most likely to contain the stuff they’re looking for. It is no wonder that companies allocate huge funds for their Adwords campaigns.

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  63. Drupal-ista Says:

    Very interesting. This page break factor is amazing. we have a discussion with a client about screen resolution matters [nothing to do with SEO but usability]. Gives some ideas how to improve the user experience.

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  68. Samuel Sylvander Says:

    For an SEO specialist these figures must exclude company name, domain name, trademarks etc because the ranking of these most certainly is already #1.

  69. flibber Says:

    impressive! The no.1 rank nearly receives 60% – i would have guessed much less. Thanks for the detailed research.

  70. Laycock Says:

    We should use eye-tracking-analysis bearing in mind also the demographic and regional preferences. Only then can we come at better conclusion. We should remember that no research is 100% true.

  71. Schweizer WordPress Magazin » Beitrag: Webmaster Tipps zum Wochenende Says:

    [...] Dies wurde übrigens durch eine Studie belegt, wie man hier nachlesen kann: Distribution of Clicks on Google’s SERPs [...]

  72. 78 Essential Search Engine Marketing & SEO Resources! | Sourfizz Says:

    [...] SEO Distribution of Clicks on Google’s SERPs The 950 Penalty or a New Ranking Theory? Google Likes Tag Pages What is a #1 Google Ranking [...]

  73. Domain Acquisition — How Much is Too Much? « Aloa’s News Blogs Says:

    [...] per month because this prospect bought PPC ads on this exact phrase for many years. And, based upon some studies, we know that a number one organic search engine ranking could get them up to 56 percent of all of [...]

  74. 80 Essential Search Engine Marketing & SEO Resources! Says:

    [...] SEO Distribution of Clicks on Google’s SERPs The 950 Penalty or a New Ranking Theory? Google Likes Tag Pages What is a #1 Google Ranking [...]

  75. Buying An Old Domain Name Says:

    [...] per month because this prospect bought PPC ads on this exact phrase for many years. And, based upon some studies, we know that a number one organic search engine ranking could get them up to 56 percent of all of [...]

  76. Beware of MonkeyClicks | Blind Five Year Old | Blind Five Year Old Says:

    [...] eye tracking study by Cornell, and reported by seoresearcher, showed the disparity in the % of clicks and % of time spent on each search [...]

  77. Why Being #1 Still Counts | The Inside Angle Says:

    [...] when conducting a search, it has been shown over and over and over again with eyetracking studies that users first look at the top result(s).  The first link, from [...]

  78. Nutzerverhalten bei den Suchergebnissen - Beitrag - Bad Boy Says:

    [...] Weitere Details zu dieser Studie gibt es bei SEO Research. [...]

  79. Dave Says:

    any plans for new research, i think most articles ive read recently seem to show less people are going past the first page, but clients still seem to be happy to be in the first few pages…

  80. Arama Motoru Optimizasyonu Says:

    i read your all articles
    that is very good
    your have perfect web site

  81. Kanti Sharma Says:

    This is exactly the article I was looking for, I needed a study like this to convince myself and my seniors that it IS worthwhile to spend a bit more for top ranking. Now my point seems to have been validated.

  82. Ari - Laberinto Social Says:

    thank you for the study guys,

    i was looking for this type of data for my readers.

    i will blockquote and trackback the source

    thanks again…

  83. Flirt Kontaktanzeigen Says:

    Is there any actual study available for 2008?

  84. yangin sondurme Says:

    Interesting and profitable results. Can I ask with which software or script using for getting this results?

  85. php dersleri Says:

    The validity of the research suffers because of the relatively small sample – only 26 participants. The patterns of search were quite natural. All the participants claimed they regularly use Google, and it was their primary search engine. Probably the search terms were predefined, but I don’t see how this could damage the validity of the study. When I am looking for a subject I usually use no more than 3 keyphrases myself, as I am (as any average web user) able to come up with a keyword/phrase relevant to my search subject in the early stages of the search.

  86. web site design orange county Says:

    good analysis and great explanation of reasons and solutions. thanks for the unique info. nice site.

  87. Cape Town SEO Says:

    Interesting and useful information for search marketers, thanks! Is there anything more recent?

  88. Diseño SEO e Internet» » ¿En que posición se hacen más click en Google? Says:

    [...] mayor información sobre esta estadistica, ingresa en SeoResearcher (Articulo en Inglés) Esta entrada ha sido escrita por admin y publicada el Noviembre 4, 2008 a [...]

  89. Importancia del posicionamiento en Google | FreebsLand Says:

    [...] la imagen que ves a la izquierda, se muestra graficamente el resultado de varios estudios realizados sobre como se maneja el usuario en Google (hacia donde mira, donde clickea, [...]

  90. Buying An Old Domain Name | New Port Me Says:

    [...] per month because this prospect bought PPC ads on this exact phrase for many years. And, based upon some studies, we know that a number one organic search engine ranking could get them up to 56 percent of all of [...]

  91. Por qué es importante aparecer en los primeros resultados de Google Says:

    [...] página de resultados de Google no es tan bueno cómo aparecer enmedio, pero en leyendo un post en Seo Researcher titulado “Distribution of Clicks on Google’s SERPs“. me doy cuenta que aparecer en el [...]

  92. Why You Must be the First, in Google’s Search Results at Least! - Akshay Technologies Says:

    [...] This is a very hot topic, but strangely there it not a large amount of research around it. The most reliable study so far comes from the Cornell University. They used an eye tracking technology to discover what percentage of users would click on each of the 10 results appearing on the first page of Google for certain topics. The results, at least my opinion, are pretty shocking, as the image below illustrates (image via SEO Researcher): [...]

  93. COG IT Solutions Pvt. Ltd. - PHP, ASP.NET, ecommerce, Joomla, Zen Cart, OsCommerce, Web 2.0, CSS, Stylesheet, Content Management, web development Says:

    [...] SEO Distribution of Clicks on Google’s SERPs The 950 Penalty or a New Ranking Theory? Google Likes Tag Pages What is a #1 Google Ranking [...]

  94. siki? Says:

    I disagree, Ive made my own research and the results are in favor of the first results on the second page.

  95. SEO, Small Improvements Can Make a Huge Difference Says:

    [...] business critical keywords can have a huge impact on your online marketing ROI. Image and quote by SEO Researcher: They used a sample of undergraduate students instructed to perform search in Google for 397 queries [...]

  96. Allt Y Coed Says:

    Fantastic article, just what I was looking for. I presume that even after this time the results would be roughly the same as google layout has not altered over all these years.

  97. Diseño Web Says:

    This is the info I was looking for, Thanks

  98. Wata cukrowa Says:

    Great article. Do you think that anyone visits 3rd or fourth page of results??

  99. Tony Kau Says:

    Excellent report! I always knew the first page was important, but now I know how important the #1 spot is. Thanks for putting this together!

  100. siki? Says:

    za Distribution of Clicks on Google’s SERPs Narzêdzia SEO i SEM SEO GoogleNarzêdzia SEO i SEM SEO Google

  101. Rent Brandon Says:

    Any chance this study has been repeated recently? Like to see this test on random users looking for information they are personally seeking.

  102. tero Says:

    Have these results been updated since the original study?

  103. Small Business Online Coach Says:

    I’d love to see this test re-done with the way the new SERP’s list things using universal search. I am sure it’d be similar, but it may offer some new data.

  104. çilek oyun Says:

    Any chance this study has been repeated recently? Like to see this test on random users looking for information they are personally seeking.

  105. Nishalspace Says:

    Really nice article to get you insight information about how search engine results are being converted

  106. sports trivia Says:

    Interesting data. It really amazes me to see what a difference there is between #1 and #2.

  107. oyun Says:

    Really nice article to get you insight information about how search engine results are being converted

  108. Discount Voucher Says:

    It would be interesting to see the click stats of a serps page with adwords on. What % of users would click on adwords adds rather than the serps results?

  109. kompresory Says:

    Well, I’m surprised that lowest position have slightly better click-ability then middle-low. It makes sense though – when you scroll down, something might catch your eye.
    Its very important to have good description then, i guess.

  110. Mobile Web Design Says:

    Given that the study was not done with true organic searchers, the results may not truely provide the kind of insite web marketers can use.

  111. seo Says:

    The validity of the research suffers because of the relatively small sample – only 26 participants. The patterns of search were quite natural. All the participants claimed they regularly use Google, and it was their primary search engine. Probably the search terms were predefined, but I don’t see how this could damage the validity of the study. When I am looking for a subject I usually use no more than 3 keyphrases myself, as I am (as any average web user) able to come up with a keyword/phrase relevant to my search subject in the early stages of the search

  112. Ardin Says:

    It really amazing the percentage different between position #1 and #2.

    This article was written back in 2006, Do we still browse the web the same way as back in 2006, now that most people are using bigger monitors and higher screen resolution?

    So is this data still valid?

  113. George Says:

    Wow this article is so usefull! Even after 3 years i find based on my own experience that the statistics still apply today.

  114. Mark Says:

    wow, i can’t believe it! The first position gets more than half of all searches! And the second position gets 4 times less clicks than the first one. I would have never guessed that the difference is so drastic. Very interesting study!

  115. Council Web Design Says:

    I’d love to see an update on this subject; Google have very different search results now – Google Maps/Local results, more paid results, etc. – which must have changed the numbers.
    One thing that nobody has mentioned so far is the ability to make up clicks that might be lost to lower ranking by righting a good meta description/Google Snippet.
    Ask Enquiro wrote a good article – which I see as a very good guide to writing snippets – http://ask.enquiro.com/2008/a-cognitive-walk-through-of-searching/#comment-1669

  116. How to Make Money Online Blogger Says:

    Interesting analysis. Search engine users know the fact that the first result in the SERP is most likely to contain the stuff they’re looking for. It is no wonder that companies allocate huge funds for their Adwords campaigns.

  117. seo firm las vegas Says:

    Just wanted to say thanks for sharing such useful information. I’ll pass it on to the readers of my blog :) Web SEO Expert.

  118. hair thinning Says:

    look at the seventh its the lovest

  119. ebeba Says:

    Great study… really awsome. I really need to work on results, to gain higher place per keyword :-) thanks a lot

  120. Peter Moore Says:

    Great study – I’ve found this useful information for building a case for organic search marketing. Thanks.

  121. Erste Seite in Google – Da kann ich doch zufrieden sein, oder nicht? > Google, Suchmaschinen > SEO, Suchergebnis, Google, Position 1, Klickrate Says:

    [...] schon etwas ältere Studie zeigt dramatische Unterschiede bei den Klickraten zwischen Position 1 und 10 auf der ersten Google [...]

  122. Mesurer le ROI en SEO – Christophe BENOIT, WEB et SEO Says:

    [...] résultats (les données datent de 2004 attention) d’après une étude EyeTracking de SeoResearcher. On peut aussi se baser sur les données d’Aol (attention les données datent de 2006) mise [...]

  123. Izrada web sajtova Says:

    Thanks for good analysis and great explanation

  124. Importance of Search Optimization | Blackbird Web Marketing Says:

    [...] Image Courtesy of SEO Researcher [...]

  125. How much is a top Google ranking worth to your business? | FreshRelease.com Web Development, Design, and Marketing Says:

    [...] Gavin found this image from SEO Researcher, highlighting the results of a much smaller eye tracking study by Cornell from [...]

  126. Eddie Larwyck Says:

    Very interesting. Although since the study was conducted with only a group of students, you cannot rely on it. There are many cases where spots other than 1 and 2 get more clicks than they have shown here. Eye grabbing title and interesting description alos comes into play.

  127. Planning Your Blog: Your Niche « Blogging Beginners Says:

    [...] numbers come from an eye-tracking study discussed here and an article at Red Cardinal. I am not affiliated with any of these [...]

  128. Park Holidays UK - Caravan Holidays Says:

    Very interesting stuff – need to avoid unlucky 7!!

    Bit of a challenge if say 10 for a search phrase – if going to go up need to ensure its atleast 4 places!

    Difficult!

  129. seo hyderabad Says:

    This is a very old story and people still commenting on this i cant believe.

  130. Top 4 Reasons Why Attorney Websites Need SEO | zevworks.net Says:

    [...] is on the first page of Google, more clients will call and come into your office. According to a Cornell University study, the top three search engine results receive 79.6% of the clicks by searchers. Top search [...]

  131. Top 4 Reasons Why Attorney Websites Need SEO « maestrosandinosintegrados Says:

    [...] is on the first page of Google, more clients will call and come into your office. According to a Cornell University study, the top three search engine results receive 79.6% of the clicks by searchers. Top search [...]

  132. Click Distribution on Google's Top 10 Says:

    [...] To read the full article visit Distribution of Clicks on Google’s SERPs [...]

  133. The Impact of Search Engine Ranking on Click Distribution | Online Marketing Business Builder Says:

    [...] – with the first result receiving more than 56% of the click distribution (image source: SEO Searcher). Cornell U's Eye Tracking Analysis Report on Click Distribution and Search Engine [...]

  134. Unlock Your Wii Says:

    The research results are very interesting; however, such results are always doubtful.

  135. Sean Says:

    great and informative posting!
    Ranking is very relative and no guarantee of being ranked on top 10 due to site competitions. with this posting many thing should be considered.

  136. Why Web Usability Trumps SEO...At First | Digital ViceGrip Says:

    [...] point gets swept almost completely under the rug in most discussions yet it is quite important. While studies studies have shown that ranking on page one in Google will probably get you more click…, it aint gonna to matter a whole heck of a lot if your website or landing page doesn’t have a [...]

  137. The Impact of Search Engine Ranking on Click Through Rate | Online Marketing Business Builder Says:

    [...] – with the first result receiving more than 56% of the click distribution (image source: SEO Searcher). Cornell_click distribution [...]

  138. SEO and Social Media: Can You Be Number One? | Living Online Says:

    [...] even more pronounced concentration in the upper stratosphere of the search results. As the graph by seoresearcher.com shows, the first positions and second positions attract 56.36% and 13.45% of the organic click [...]

  139. Clickthrough Rates in the Age of Google Universal Search « Search Marketing Standard Says:

    [...] Google SEPR Click and Attention distribution ‘heat-map’ (via seoresearcher.com) [...]

  140. Getting the most out of Google Product Search | Bojago Says:

    [...] searches, often lose out to retailers or other sites. Owning that top spot is key, as shown in this heat-map of user click behavior: The top result receives over 50% of the [...]

  141. Google Changed Reputation and Privacy Forever | theConstitutional.org Says:

    [...] on a person’s life.  For example, the top five Google search results for any search term get 88% of the clicks.  The over-attention given to the first few Google results is partly user error, but it’s also a [...]

  142. Maave Says:

    Uh, hello? That’s the point- most relevant searches go to the top. Why are people so surprised?

  143. Comportamiento del usuario | Adtribe Says:

    [...] saber mas sobre este estudio pueden visitar la siguiente pagina Seo Researcher [...]

  144. Google People Search Uk Says:

    [...] Cornell University Study Shows the% of users who click on each link of Google in a typical search results [...]

  145. Blog planning: choosing a niche Says:

    [...] numbers come from an eye-tracking study discussed here and an article at Red Cardinal. I am not affiliated with any of these [...]

  146. Phentermine Says:

    This is good analyze, however I wonder why results are so different between different researches that can be found on internet…

  147. Carmen Brodeur Says:

    It would be interesting to see an update to this study in 2010 taking into account, adwords, google maps and add extensions.

  148. In search of the Social Google « excapite Says:

    [...] to page landings based on page rank. For example; previous academic studies suggested a CTR for a top ranking at around the 56% mark and sliding down to less than 1% as the eye falls down the page. However the metrics we have gathered here on excapite suggest the page 1 CTR rates are closer to [...]

  149. SEO Scientist – Applying the scientific method to SEO » Blog Archive » Post8 Says:

    [...] http://www.seoresearcher.com/distribution-of-clicks-on-googles-serps-and-eye-tracking-analysis.htm [...]

  150. Análisis sobre la distribución de clics en el TOP 10 de Google Says:

    [...] información (inglés): http://www.seoresearcher.com/distribution-of-clicks-on-googles-serps-and-eye-tracking-analysis.htm ¿Te interesó este artículo? Compártelo con tus [...]

  151. Artyku?y Tematyczne Says:

    I use this research scientists of Cornell University, but in .pdf arn’t this heatmap which is use in this article. Who made this heatmap??

  152. How To Get Your Sites To The Top Of The Search Engines Says:

    [...] (Image by: SEO Researcher) [...]

  153. Sonali Says:

    this studies the eye pattern but what about brain patterns? i prefer organic search as opposed to ads simply because they are there because of content, use and links etc… ads are put there because they win the bids… or is it because i know this as opposed to people who dont know this… then again the relevant question to ask would be how do people who understand the net v/s people who dont surf… the study is too restricted in its parameters dont you all feel?

  154. Gordon Says:

    As far as I know this kind of study is performed in one of universities in my country. I’ll gladly check their results and compare it with this article. Cheers

  155. punjab engineer Says:

    i visited your site by clicking on some other site which provided to your link. the information given by you on ur site is amazing. have u done study on bing and yahoo also or just google?

  156. Slash Prices Says:

    I think Distribution of clicks will also vary based on the call to action of the meta description. I know I would skip no 1 in SERPS if the description was poor or didn’t match what I was searching for!

  157. PADI IDC Says:

    Great study of clicks , this kind of analysis must be made by all webmaster at least at 3 or 6 months for better results.

  158. » Top 3 ways to monetize what you’ve learned in “Networks.” » Cornell Info 2040 - Networks Says:

    [...] SERPs usually receive 80% of the searching traffic according to a study done at Cornell University.Distribution of Clicks on Google’s SERPs (oh look, I just gave them a vote!) Having a website ranked in the top three results is the hard [...]

  159. Gold Wedding Rings Says:

    This research looks interesting. I was sure about the difference in 7th and 8th position. But wasn’t sure between 9th and 10th position. So, it seems interesting.

  160. Peter Charalambos Says:

    You know…..although fascinating, I wonder if the results would have been different with a larger number of participants.

    I for one have been searching for this sort of survey to show our students so, even as it is, I’m happy to use the information to help students understand how clients find us.

  161. Which Law Firm Owns the Most Digital Real Estate? | Legal Marketing: Social Media Edition Says:

    [...] second question: Does it matter that the biggest firms aren’t ranking in Google searches? Studies have shown that more than 56% of people running a Google search click on the very first result, 13% on the [...]

  162. Seoko Says:

    Any recent study available?

  163. ads for free Says:

    This is great I was just looking for something like this.It looks like it really important to be in at least the top 4 positions to get any sort of decent traffic.

  164. Click Distribution & Percentages by SERP Ranking Position + Agent SEO Says:

    [...] conducted a user-behavoir study focused around search behavoir specifically on Google. They used an eye-tracking study of a sample of undergraduate students to determine clicks and attention [...]

  165. Prima pagina su GOOGLE in Prima Posizione | mascali.net - idee, parole, pensieri. Says:

    [...] ancora nella ambitissima prima posizione tutto il tuo lavoro è vanificato. Osserviaamo sul sito http://www.seoresearcher.com un’interessante analisi della distribuzione dei clicks e del tempo trascorso nella pagine [...]

  166. Carmen Brodeur Says:

    I’d love to see a similar analysis now that the serps have changed to a 7pack or 9pack local results above organic.

  167. SetVPS.Com » How Much is a Top Google Ranking Worth to Your Online Business? Says:

    [...] Cornell University Study shows the % of people who clicked on each google link on a typical results page. The results for [...]

  168. Que vaut un positionnement de numéro 1 dans les résultats Google ? » argent.info : Stratégies pour gagner de l'argent sur Internet Says:

    [...] image de SEO Researcher, resultant d'une étude sur le regard par Cornell en [...]

  169. Ideenfindung & Keywordrecherche für das Nischenprojekt (Teil 2) « Bloggonaut.net Says:

    [...] der erste Platz, dies verdeutlicht auch die Auswertung zum Klickverhalten in den Google SERPs der Cornell University, ein Blick auf das Bild verdeutlicht, das Platz 1 der SERPs wie vermutet die meisten Klicks [...]

  170. Werth-It Fundraising Blog » Blog Archive » Lift your website in Google searches Says:

    [...] When people look for you, you want to be first in the search list, without paying for it.  The reason you want to be first is because 53% of individuals go to the first listing in Google.  Another 13% go to the second listing.  (Here’s a really good explanation of this: http://www.seoresearcher.com/distribution-of-clicks-on-googles-serps-and-eye-tracking-analysis.htm.) [...]

  171. Poker Affiliate Says:

    Very useful, thanks.

  172. RAK Says:

    Amazing that there is no current study. SEO and SERPS have a direct impact on today´s marketing strategies.

  173. Shaun Baird Says:

    Hi, this is great research, can you tell me your thoughts on this, since Google now push lots of adwords ads, and have blended them in with the main results – before the paid ads were in a blue bar at the top, but they are now blended in, meaning the best anyone can attain these days is position 4, but if Google put image results and video results in the page we are then pushed effectively “below the fold” – meaning our results as site builders is diminished.

    Effectively Google have done this to stop spammers, I can see that, but for those of us who aim for quality content its not fair when we lose most of our traffic in favor of Googles profits.

    Shaun

  174. srvaliente | blog seo Says:

    Data are devastating. But, I think you should update the study.

  175. Google Click Distribution – How Important is Number One? | Internet Marketing Blog - Search Engine Optimization, Pay Per Click & More! Says:

    [...] University conducted one of the most interesting studies I’ve seen on the topic, using eye tracking to study not just which links were clicked, but [...]

  176. juegos de bob esponja Says:

    Excellent report! and also very successful as in my case I get the following results.

    # 2 = 13.39%, almost the same% of clicks that show in the study.
    # 6 = 2,98% a little farther from the results.

    The study results could help us to predict how profitable could be our niche

  177. Focusing on Google could deny your website extra traffic | My Blog Says:

    [...] at Cornell University have a lot to answer for. Back in 2006 they studied the click through rates according to the position of a website in the Google Search [...]

  178. Liverpool woes reflect your search engine problems | My Blog Says:

    [...] in the top four positions of the search results page for any given keyword search you are nowhere. Studies have consistently shown that 80% of all clicks on a Google search results page go to the top four [...]

  179. Clicks in Serps, waarom zijn de top-3 positie belangrijk | PaulG.nl Says:

    [...] Distribution of Clicks on Google’s SERPs delen: Delen op Facebook Tip on Hyves Delen op Linkedin Tweet hierover Subscribe to the comments on this post februari 21st, 2011 | categorie: Informatie [...]

  180. STCR Says:

    According to this, users will go to the last result prior stopping in the middle ones. This is ok if there is not images, when images appear on results eye-map might change.

  181. santa teresa costa rica Says:

    In fact, images might make users even skip the first results to go to the relevant image.

  182. Google Gets Gamed | Gaia Group Public Relations Says:

    [...] all, the top search results of a Google search typically generate four times the traffic than the next highest result. In fact, more than two thirds of internet users don’t [...]

  183. How to Make A Digital Business Card in 5 Easy Steps | ThirdMinds.com Says:

    [...] find this scary, take it an opportunity to instead direct these people to a site created by you. Since the first three listings get over 79% of the traffic, make it your goal to reach the top three spots on Google for your [...]

  184. New Homes Blackpool Says:

    I work on the basis that being at number one for a given keyword could obtain 25% of Google’s estimated traffic.

  185. Great Study on Consumer Behaviors on Search Engines « KGS Multimedia Blog Says:

    [...] more on Consumer Behaviors on Search Engines. Tags: Backlinks, Online Marketing, Research, [...]

  186. epoksi Says:

    In fact, images might make users even skip the first results to go to the relevant image.

  187. Voucher Codes UK Says:

    We still get quite a bit of traffic even if some of our landing pages are on page 2, but yes the higher up on the first page the better providing we have good enough meta description

  188. Mike Glover | SEO Services Says:

    Anyone else find this truly disturbing that NO ONE has done any formal studies on this since 2006? Or that Google has not released their own data on this?

  189. Why You Must be the First, in Google’s Search Results at Least! | Instant paying ptc sites,Paying ptc,Best ptc sites,ptc sites Says:

    [...] This is a very hot topic, but strangely there it not a large amount of research around it. The most reliable study so far comes from the Cornell University. They used an eye tracking technology to discover what percentage of users would click on each of the 10 results appearing on the first page of Google for certain topics. The results, at least my opinion, are pretty shocking, as the image below illustrates (image via SEO Researcher): [...]

  190. El blog de LogoRapid: diseño útil para las empresas » Blog Archive » SEO: factores para generar ventas Says:

    [...] (Fuente: http://www.seoresearcher.com/distribution-of-clicks-on-googles-serps-and-eye-tracking-analysis.htm) [...]

  191. Kyle Logue Says:

    This is a really interesting study. It’s nice to see that some people actually take the time to really study what people look at when using search engines.

  192. Copy and paste Says:

    Useful study. Who could think that #8 position gets less clicks than #10. Something to work on :)

  193. Sabine Says:

    One thing people should think of:

    Is the searcher looking for an information or to buy?
    I know from own research, that as for information, above click distribution is perfectly right, but when it comes to a case, in which the searcher is looking for a good deal and is looking for a product to buy, he will research all top results including second page. The higher value the product has, the more research will be conducted and will therefore attrackt clicks to all the top ranking pages in SERPS.

  194. Scraper Web Dude Says:

    You guys complaining about the innacuracy about this study make it look as useless. I do find it quie insightful even though I’m sure there are deeper studies. The fact that they were not “really” searching for anything won’t necesarily move the balance towards the first results. They probably had a minimum time so they would search just from boredom anyway.

  195. iskele Says:

    I believe there are more eye-tracking studies including those ones covering more than the 1st page of search results. I used this one because it was ‘approved’ by Google – I found it among the ‘Papers by Googlers’ at Google Labs: labs.google.com/papers.html

  196. IN: The disembodied search and other weapons of Mass Distraction « Says:

    [...] term “Noise” reflects the biological component of the interaction in the way the user scans his informational environment . The manner in which Google returns a page adapted to the communication-hungry organism is based on [...]

  197. Impact of Rankings on SERP CTR | DEJAN SEO Says:

    [...] clickthrough rates (CTR) in search engine result pages (SERP) and most SEO companies still quote outdated information which may not even be relevant anymore. Dejan SEO team has performed new research in this field in [...]

  198. How Google is Killing Residential Solar Power | One Block Off the Grid: The Smart New Way to Go Solar Says:

    [...] [Source: SEO Researcher] [...]

  199. Why is SEO important to Small Business ?SEOhatch Says:

    [...] having a presence on the search engine results page, or SERPs, you significantly decrease your company’s visibility. I like to describe search engine results and internet traffic as a [...]

  200. Why is SEO important to Small Business ?SEOhatch Says:

    [...] having a presence on the search engine results page, or SERPs, you significantly decrease your company’s visibility. I like to describe search engine results and internet traffic as a [...]

  201. Lawyer Wesbites Says:

    Thanks for posting the eye-tracking studies including those ones covering more than the 1st page of search results. Also thanks for the link about Google Papers!

  202. Interwall Says:

    Thanks for this informative arcticle and all the constructive critisism – but is there anybody out there who can actually tell me where to find the “true” figures??

  203. Mejor Posicionamiento conociendo el Eye-Tracking | Marketing Curso-Marketing Estrategico-Posicionamiento Marketing Says:

    [...] Información recogida de http://www.seoresearcher.com/distribution-of-clicks-on-googles-serps-and-eye-tracking-analysis.htm [...]

  204. My method not to cannibalize your SEO with SEM Says:

    [...] queries that drive a great part of your traffic. But are you doing that well? Probably not. A lot studies show that of users are focused on the five first results on Google. So my point here is to divide [...]

  205. schimmelinfectie Says:

    Het is een goede post ook al is het wat aan de oudere kant.

  206. Fará? - rady a tipy pro za?ínající fará?e » Školení Says:

    [...] internetového marketingu: http://www.atim.cz/ Kolik procent lidí kliká na r?zné pozice: http://www.seoresearcher.com/distribution-of-clicks-on-googles-serps-and-eye-tracking-analysis.htm Post tags: Posted in: Neza?azené ~ [...]

  207. Importance of Top Rankings in the Search Engines | Money Visa Says:

    [...] a user-behavoir study focused around search behavoir specifically on Google. They used an eye-tracking study of a sample of undergraduate students to determine clicks and attention [...]

  208. lui74 Says:

    you need to be between the first 4 results in google to get a decent amount of clicks, interesting article

  209. The Rosener Equation: How to Value Premium Generic Domain Names Says:

    [...] The estimated click-through rate of the No. 1 position in Google’s organic search results for any keyword or keyword phrase search is 35 percent, 20 percent for the No. 2 position. Supporing sources include Optify, Free SEO News, CNN, Search Engine Watch and SEO Researcher. [...]

  210. The Rosener Equation: How to Value Premium Generic Domain Names | Domain Industry News Says:

    [...] The estimated click-through rate of the No. 1 position in Google’s organic search results for any keyword or keyword phrase search is 35 percent, 20 percent for the No. 2 position. Supporing sources include Optify, Free SEO News, CNN, Search Engine Watch and SEO Researcher. [...]

  211. The Cline Group » Blog Archive » A Picture is Now Worth a Thousand Hits (on Google) Says:

    [...] to eye-tracking and click research, roughly 56% of people searching for a term click on the first search-result – and an estimated [...]

  212. Snooth Blog » An SEO guide for Wineries Part 4 Says:

    [...] are. Although this article is from 2006 and the numbers may have changed slightly, you can see how powerful a top ranking can be. The fact is, people rely on the engines to give them the most relevant and best information on [...]

  213. Thomas Schulze Says:

    Great research, thanks a lot!

  214. Google expands sitelinks Says:

    [...] Read More Econsultancy SEO Researcher [...]

  215. Indianapolis Attorneys Says:

    Are these stats the same on Yahoo and Bing? With Bing usually indexing less pages then Google, does this change anything?

  216. Revitol Anti Wrinkle Says:

    I’ve been told of this research but are there any other new research? As this was taken in 2006.

    I guess the result might have changed by now. As the internet has evolved a bit since then.

  217. DC Ranch Homes For Sale Says:

    What a great site cant wait to learn more about seo..

  218. Cách SEO – V? trí nào t?t nh?t ?? qu?ng bá website? | Ki?n T?p T? Says:

    [...] ki?m trên Google. Nhóm ?ã s? d?ng công ngh? theo dõi chuy?n ??ng c?a m?t (Eye-tracking study) và ti?n hành trên các sinh viên c?a Cornell ?? xác ??nh hành vi click và s? [...]

  219. Organic Search Strategist Says:

    Hey, how accurate are these percentages these days? Has much changed since this article was published? Anyone know where we can get the most recent, up-to-date information regarding the distribution of home page search shares?

  220. Was ist SEO? | bazillus.biz Says:

    [...] eine Suchmaschine benutzen. So verteilen sich die Klicks beim Marktführer Google, laut einer Studie von 2006 wie [...]

  221. artlio – Artikel Links Online Says:

    [...] gibt es gute Gründe. Nur ein echter Profi bringt Sie nach oben und hält Sie auch dort.» Distribution of Clicks on Google’s SERPsWhat percentage of clicks get each listing on the search result page? Eye tracking analysis gives [...]

  222. Doug Williams » Insights Into Search Behavior: How People Use Search Engines Says:

    [...] Page Results: According to a Cornell University study the first page of search engine results receive 87.5% of the total click distribution with the #1 [...]

  223. Google: Duopol oder Monopol | basic Says:

    [...] auf der zweiten und weiteren Trefferseiten fallen drastisch in der Wahrnehmung ab (Quelle 1, Quelle 2, Quelle 3). Schon die gegebene Verengung auf wenige Suchtreffer ist als kritisch zu erachten, denkt [...]

  224. Distribution of Clicks on Google’s SERPs | Local Search Business Says:

    [...] Distribution of Clicks on Google’s SERPs October 26th, 2006 [...]

  225. SEO Trends and Predictions for 2010 Says:

    [...] and visitor’s attention towards lower ranked results within the first page. Even in the past the share of attention for bottom ranked first page results is almost [...]

  226. vegas seo Says:

    No one wants to just stay at the top of page 2, though. They want to work their way up to the top of page 1 where the good traffic is. It just means they’ll take a hit on the way there as they pass through the lower parts of page 1.

  227. Aaron Marks Says:

    Hey Guys -

    Just thought that you should know that while SEO – PPC – SEM stuff can get really confusing.

    I work for a company called promotionalvideos.us and we do… PROMOTIONAL VIDEOS! There is no better way to sum up a complicated business or value solution than with a promotional video.

    Please just love seeing a strong yet simple promotional video on a home page. It says them tons of time reading and is much more entertaining and engaging. Check out some of the vids that we have done on our website http://www.promotionalvideos.us and see our sample videos link.

    I look forward to working together and building your team an amazing promotional video.

    Aaron M

  228. Seven Seat Cars Says:

    Eye-Tracking studies really helps a lot in order to have more knowledge and understand a lot with regards on the importance of abstracts that was being presented and in addition also with selecting links.This information became really useful especially to those Internet Marketers that are the major concern in creating and providing this kind of topic.

  229. Google bada swoj? wyszukiwark? poprzez eye tracking | Usability & Interactive blog Says:

    [...] Artyku? z Cornell University [...]

  230. Travel SEO – How to Target Searchers at the Right Stage of the Buying Cycle | SEOptimise Says:

    [...] search rankings. Then you can take a holiday of your own to sit back and relax, whilst enjoying the 56% clickthrough rates which are only possible via the top organic [...]

  231. What Being Number One On Google Gets You Says:

    [...] distribution on Google SERPs (search engine result pages). One at Cornell University found that 50% of clicks were on the #1 spot, while other studies place it as low as 18%. The latter uses a similar methodology to my much [...]

  232. The value of a top 10 ranking on Google Says:

    [...] Cornell University conducted a user-behavoir study focused around search behavoir specifically on Google. They used an [...]

  233. Teddy Chambers Says:

    The CTR rate you gave was very much helpful for me. Thanks a lot for posting that, I’ve never ever saw that and that helped me in understanding the Google Search results perfectly.

  234. The Rosener Equation: How to Value Premium Generic Domain Names « Domain Don Says:

    [...] No. 2 position. Supporing sources includeOptify, Free SEO News, CNN, Search Engine Watch and SEO Researcher. A new study by Slingshot SEO released on July 28, 2011, and entitled “Mission ImposSERPble: [...]

  235. Click Distribution | Eye Tracking | Heatmaps | CTR and SEO Says:

    [...] The way users interact with SERPs is one of the most frequently discussed topics in the SEO community and is also a very important field of study for the search engine specialists. To answer the critical questions regarding click distribution on a SERP page, researchers employ so-called eye tracking experiments. [...]

  236. Estimar el Tráfico de Palabras Clave de Forma Automática Says:

    [...] Estudio AOL. 2- Estudio de Nielsen y Loranger en el libro Prioritizing Web Usability. 3- Estudio de Cornell University basados en un panel de usuarios.Posición SERP [...]

  237. ubrubey Says:

    nice post…i’ve been studying about SEO for a couple of months now and so far i’m make an article about it. Thanks for the information. :)

  238. Internet Marketing News From Around The Web « SEO Milton Keynes Nudge It Budge It Move It Ltd Says:

    [...] Full Article: http://www.seoresearcher.com/distribution-of-clicks-on-googles-serps-and-eye-tracking-analysis.htm [...]

  239. outsourcing Says:

    Pretty impressive but hard to believe. And specially since we see first 3 adwords slots, then usally wikipedia, often followed by a youtube video…

    But still it is a fact that the first 3 results getting the most traffic.

  240. Google, Amazon and Our “One-Click” Culture Says:

    [...] to various studies, including one done at Cornell University (http://www.seoresearcher.com/distribution-of-clicks-on-googles-serps-and-eye-tracking-analysis.htm), the drop-off from the first page of search results to the second page is significant.  Not only [...]

  241. Altinkum Says:

    This study is 5 years old now, has there been a newer one?

  242. The Importance Of Ranking At The Top Of Google | All about 2012 Trends Says:

    [...] and other businesses made their own website and expanded on the World Wide Web. According to an eye tracking study, people who search in Google click on the topmost entry. This is the number one website ranked by [...]

  243. Blog.Climutu | Let's Talk! » Artikel » Albert Steven, Campus Drop Out Karena Keasyikan Cari Uang di Dunia Internet Marketing Says:

    [...] “Google heat map” di google, lalu pilih gambar, atau klik link ini [...]

  244. ????? ? Google Says:

    [...] via DailyBlogTips & SeoResearcher. [...]

  245. Web Brand Reputation Management | Online Brands::: Local Businesses::: Corporate 500 Says:

    [...] (Source: http://www.seoresearcher.com/distribution-of-clicks-on-googles-serps-and-eye-tracking-analysis.htm) [...]

  246. links Says:

    As the first comment indicates, a key point is to know why people were searching those themes, how they made them to search particular themes. And it’s obviuos people had no intrest at all in the searches they were doing. You’re not searching the same way when they tell you to as when you try to buy a product at the lowest price possible. So, I think the study is incomplete.

  247. 7 Reasons You Aren’t Making the Most of Your Organic Search Rankings | advies over geld lenen Says:

    [...] difference between paid and non-paid results listings. Now, if you remember, according to the old Cornell University study, if nothing distracts the searcher (no rich snippets are displayed), over 56% of people click on [...]

  248. Online user journey | How to plan your user's online journey | ABC Copywriting blog Says:

    [...] place names) than it is to appear on page two or lower for high-traffic ‘generic’ terms. Research shows that almost 80% of searchers click on the first three natural [...]

  249. tworzenie stron internetowych Says:

    Nice article. Do you have some fresh and more actual informations?

  250. Major Television Stations Feature MyLocalLookup Search Says:

    [...] Since this has never been done before no one can promise specific results and it will vary by business; however, there is ample evidence that the top listings in search engines consistently get the lion’s share of clicks with the top two listings receiving half of all visitors! [...]

  251. Mercedes - Yoga Para Principiantes Says:

    Very useful and interesting eye tracking study, which motivates us every day to improve our efforts to do SEO properly. Thanks for the information. Greetings.

  252. Warning: Two Ways of Killing Your Organic Rankings in Google Says:

    [...] Also some eye tracking studies show similar data: http://www.seoresearcher.com/distribution-of-clicks-on-googles-serps-and-eye-tracking-analysis.htm [...]

  253. Chris Green Says:

    Very Useful Information. I did’nt have time to read it all but I did mark it in my favorites so that I can come back and look at it. I found it when I searched ” the 1st result on google gets twice as many clicks as the secound result” I’m thinking about creating a blog about this subject if I do I will definitley be using this page as one of my links.
    Thanks for the valuble information.

    Chris

  254. How to Capture 75% of the Clicks for a Given Query - Keith Brown Says:

    [...] 35% of the clicks for a given term, 10% for #2, and so on. Honestly I don’t really want a percentage of the click distribution for my branded terms, I want all the [...]

  255. Google: Strive for Relevancy But Don’t Forget Small Businesses | Silkstream Says:

    [...] University carried out some eye tracking research on search engine users back in 2006. The results of the study are as follows: Position 1 of organic [...]

  256. Insights Into Search Behavior: How People Use Search Engines | Says:

    [...] Page Results: According to a Cornell University study the first page of search engine results receive 87.5% of the total click distribution with the #1 [...]

  257. Flushing Your Link Building Budget Down the Toilet?The 2013 Keyword Strategy Cheat Sheet. | The Truth Says:

    [...] searches for your pet term? Party! Right? Not quite. Even at posi­tion 5 for that term, with a click through rate less than 5%, your best hope is 2,500 monthly vis­its to your site. Alter­na­tively, if you pur­sue 25 terms [...]

  258. Pengaruh Ranking Di Halaman Pertama Hasil Pencarian | ToffeeNet Says:

    [...] SEOResearcher.com melakukan riset mereka mengenai hal tersebut. Hasilnya adalah: [...]

  259. 10 Ways to SEO Your Blog Posts | Kyle's Blog Says:

    [...] sources people today use for obtaining information and also that people do not tend to go very deep in the search results. This means that ranking higher in those results maximizes the chances of your content being [...]

  260. Burying a Bad Online Reputation Says:

    [...] to a Cornell University study, 56 percent of Google users click on the first result shown after a search. Only 13 percent visit [...]

  261. Perché è importante essere nelle prime posizioni di Google Says:

    […] è stata realizzata un’estesa ricerca alla Cornell University su 397 parole chiave e 36 soggetti (figura seguente) che conferma questi […]

  262. Burying a Bad Online Reputation - Cookerly Public Relations & Marketing Services Says:

    […] to a Cornell University study, 56 percent of Google users click on the first result shown after a search. Only 13 percent visit […]

  263. SEO and Social Media: Can You Be Number One? Says:

    […] even more pronounced concentration in the upper stratosphere of the search results. As the graph by seoresearcher.com shows, the first positions and second positions attract 56.36% and 13.45% of the organic click […]

  264. Why Being First in Google Will Really Help Grow Your Real Estate Business | The Real Estate Bloggers Says:

    […] As you can see from the graph below and a SERP ‘heat-map’ based on it, the first two listings capture over a half of the user’s attention in terms of time of the eye fixation. Whereas the attention is shared almost equally, the difference in number of click between the first two listings is much more surprising: over four times! via SeoResearcher. […]

  265. referencer mon site Says:

    Wow this article is so usefull! Even after 3 years i find based on my own experience that the statistics still apply today.

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